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CSU Students Share Their Holiday Traditions

The holidays are here along with all the joy and frustration they bring are upon us. Some of these holiday symptoms are: cold weather, crowded malls and the looming threat of a Christmas album by some SoundCloud rapper are unfortunate. Others symptoms, like parties, Starbucks holiday drinks and presents are more joyous and capture the spirit of the holidays.

Perhaps the best part of the holidays are the times spent with family, and all the festive traditions. Some Colorado State University students shared their favorite family traditions and thoughts on the most wonderful time of year.

CSU senior communication studies major, Max Lukaswitz, celebrates Christmas at his aunt’s house with the majority of his family. They open presents, watch a basketball game on TV and end the night with coffee and an assortment of Italian pastries. According to Lukaswitz, his family’s traditions, “make Christmas unique to my family and create a fun, loving atmosphere.”

CSU freshman Zoology major, Ryan Gardner’s, family has a tradition of going to the movies on Christmas day. They plan on seeing the new Star Wars film, The Last Jedi, this December. “Seeing Star Wars is something my whole family can enjoy,” Gardner said. Gardner has also started a tradition of his own in college, hanging up Hanukah related pictures on his dorm door, aiming to make a more welcoming environment after recent events on campus.

Sierra Simpson, a CSU sophomore ecosystem science and sustainability major, celebrates both Hanukkah and Christmas. “My parents practice different religions so we celebrate both,” Simpson said. In the weeks leading up to Christmas, her family lights the candles on the menorah opens some gifts, the rest being opened on Christmas day. Christmas morning, her mother cooks a big breakfast and they all go to the movies.

Sophomore Doug Johnson, a CSU psychology and human development and family studies major, spends Christmas day cooking with his family, listening to music and singing along. After dinner and a movie, Johnson and his mother do a puzzle together, a tradition that’s become “an important part of my family’s holiday,” he said. Johnson also goes to a hockey game with his father, it is “a good chance to catch up on each other’s lives while sharing something we both enjoy.”

Traditions are arguably the most important parts of the holidays, especially to college students who may only see their families over breaks. “I always look forward to them so much,” Simpson said.

Lukaswitz stresses the importance of traditions, that they “make people see the good in everyone,” something we, unfortunately, need reminding of from time to time.

These traditions will be a constant theme in these student’s future holiday celebrations, and will no doubt be added onto and tweaked in the future. “Traditions will be even more important later on in my life,” Gardner said, “I will always remember these times with my family and maybe continue them with a family I start up.”

Hopefully, this story has inspired you to look forward to even the most cringe-worthy of traditions your family has to offer.